Oxides & Colorants

"An oxide which promotes ceramic fusion by interaction with other oxides. The oxides which are usually referred to as fluxes are the alkaline oxides because they interact with the glass-forming silica. Fluxes are monoxides with chemical formulae in the R2O and RO group. The acceptable exceptions are the sesquioxides: boron oxide and bismuth oxide. Fluxes are introduced as monoxides, dioxides, carbonates, and other compounds. Silicates using R2O and R2O3 fluxes soften slowly. Silicates involving RO fluxes tend to soften more quickly."
-The Potter's Dictionary of Materials and Techniques

Products In This Category

Displaying products 1 - 30 of 35 results
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$2.98

Alumina Oxide is an intermediate oxide, and is used to stabilize fluxes and glass formers that compose glazes. It is calcined and ground to 325 mesh.
$23.97

Derived principally from stibnite, its principle use is an opacifier in porcelain enamels.
$13.88

A versatile colorant used in glazes to most commonly produce various green tints.
$19.72
A fine, particled, lavender powder used as a colorant in glazes and slips. It is the most stable and reliable colorant. Produces various shades of blue when used alone, and will produce the same shades of blue when used in almost every type of glaze.
$59.06

A fine, particled, lavender powder used as a colorant in glazes and slips. It is the most stable and reliable colorant. Produces various shades of blue when used alone.
$18.12
A reliable, stable, black powdered oxide. In small amounts it produces consistently strong blue tones. Used as a glaze colorant and brushing oxide decoration.
$54.28

A reliable, stable, black powdered oxide. In small amounts it produces consistently strong blue tones. Used as a glaze colorant and brushing oxide decoration.
$9.73
A water-soluble, reddish powder—the least potent of the cobalt compounds.
$29.13

A water-soluble, reddish powder—the least potent of the cobalt compounds.
$12.48

A green powder used as a glaze colorant. Depending on conditions and formulation it may produce green, blue-green or copper red. TOXIC IN RAW FORM.
$13.36

This is the oldest glaze colorant known. It is a strong flux and will produce fluid glazes. Can produce copper reds in reduction firings. TOXIC IN RAW FORM.
$17.36

Red copper is a reduced form of the normal black copper oxide.
$2.76

Produces grey brown colors in engobes and in underglazes that include zinc. If tin is present it may produce pink and reddish browns. Can also be added with manganese compounds to clay bodies to produce greys or to darken a color.
$3.00

A natural iron oxide. Reddish-brown raw color.
$5.27

Ferric oxide. Basically the same as black iron oxide except not as concentrated.
$2.60
81% Fe2O3 , this imported, natural iron oxide is bright red in its raw form.
$5.23

A weaker form of iron—high clay content.
$6.53

Source of magnesium in glazes. Imparts strength and color with little shrinkage. In larger proportions, it produces a dry opaque quality to glazes.
$4.84

For refractory applications.
$1.90

A mineral form of black iron oxide. When mixed in clay body or glazes, produces a speckling effect. (Should be screened due to inconsistent particle sizes.)
$8.71

A weak coloring agent. In an alkaline glaze, a blue-purple or plum color can be obtained. In leadless glazes, a purple-brown may result. It is a power flux.
$3.55

A black powder which gives red, brown, purple or black tones to clay bodies and glazes. A strong flux when added in large amounts to clay bodies.
$2.43

A black powder which gives red, brown, purple or black tones to clay bodies and glazes. A strong flux when added in large amounts to clay bodies.
$17.67

Common glaze colorant. Green nickel produces a variety of browns, blues, grays and yellows depending on the presence of other materials in the glaze.
$9.68
Black nickel produces browns, blues, grays and yellows in glazes. It can also tone down more intense colorants such as cobalt and copper. Maximum use is usually 3%.
$28.94

Black nickel produces browns, blues, grays and yellows in glazes. It can also tone down more intense colorants such as cobalt and copper. Maximum use is usually 3%.
$5.00

A natural hydrated earthy ferric oxide. Contains hydrated iron oxide. Can be calcined at 550-600°C.
$18.29

Used in glass to give a green color and used in ceramic glazes to produce chrome-tin pink, low-fire reds, greens and purplish-red colors.
$4.24

Also known as Pearl Ash. It is a strong flux and can be used as a color modifier in glazes.
$7.04

An iron-bearing clay which is used as a colorant in engobes, stains, underglazes and overglaze decoration.
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